Friday mystery object #310 answer


Last week I thought it was time for some more bones, so I gave you this specimen from the Dead Zoo to have a go at identifying:

mystery310

There was no scale, the photo is far from ideal and the specimen isn’t in the best condition, but the animal is pretty distinctive, so I thought it wouldn’t prove too much of a challenge – and it turns out that I was right.

Palfreyman1414 was the first to identify it to genus level, correctly recognising that it was one of the two Notoryctes species of Marsupial Mole from Australia.

The weird limbs are a pretty good indicator this being a digger, with large muscle attachments and robust forelimbs, but it has couple of large claws rather than the ridiculous giant hands of the Old World Moles and it has a shorter skull.

Double prep mole from the Horniman Museum

Double prep of an Old World Mole Talpa europaea from the Horniman Museum & Gardens

The skull is more similar to that of the golden moles of southern Africa, although their rostrum (nosey bits) tends to be more concave while the marsupial moles have a more convex rostrum (and in some cases, weirdly flaring zygomatic arches).

mystery268

Lateral view of the skull of a Giant Golden Mole Chrysospalax trevelyani from the Grant Museum of Zoology

Now distinguishing between the two species of Marsupial Mole is a bit more tricky, not least because they are quite poorly known animals and there aren’t many specimens available for comparison – this is particularly true of the Northern species, which was first described as recently as 1920.

This is actually quite useful to know, since the mystery specimen came into the collection in 1897 – from Southern Australia – so it’s safe to say it’s the Southern Marsupial Mole Notoryctes typhlops (Stirling, 1889), but that’s not very helpful from a morphological perspective.

So far I’ve not found any useful skeletal features that help differentiate the two species, but apparently their fur colour is a little different, with the Northern species having pinkish or cinnamon fur and the Southern species having yellowish-white to a deep gold. To see what they look like with their fur, here’s the taxidermy partner to the mystery skeleton:

Southern_marsupial_mole

Taxidermy Southern Marsupial Mole Notoryctes typhlops in the National Museum of Ireland – Natural History

As with most moles these subterranean critters have adapted to spending much of their time underground by losing their eyes, investing in some serious digging equipment and tuning in to smells and low frequency sounds.

I hope you enjoyed this little tour around the main moles of the world! More mysteries next week.

6 thoughts on “Friday mystery object #310 answer

  1. Ta for this Paolo, as always. Question that occurred to me: maybe the Northern Species was only described and recognised in the 1920s, but perhaps some specimens, not recognised as such, were presented for taxidermy in 1897? How can we be sure this is a Southern specimen?

  2. Does it have a more precise locality listed? South Australia (the state) is a big place (and I’m not sure its borders were the same in 1897 as they are now). (And, of course, “Southern Australia” isn’t the same thing as South Australia!)

    The difference in rostrum shape between Southern Australia and Southern Africa is quite striking!

    • And… significantly, the ranges shown are contiguous so overlap is possible. I think Paolo may be pulling a fast one. Shall we politely request DNA testing?

      My own “wisdom of Solomon” take: the Northern species was declared distinct in the 1930s. Epistemologically speaking, therefore, in 1897 there was only one species of marsupial mole, and this is it.

      You know it makes sense.

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