Friday mystery object #359 answer


Last week I gave you this fishy mystery to have a go at solving:

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I find fish a bit tricky, simply because there are so many different species out there – 33,100 described so far and rising. That’s more than all other vertebrates combined, so it’s not surprising that they can be a challenge.

However, this cartoonish looking little fish has some quite distinctive features that help narrow down the identification. There’s the duck-face with a couple of little barbels between its eyes and the clumping of the fins to the tail end. It also has a nice colour, but as I regularly say, that’s seldom a very reliable guide.

Generally, fish shaped like this don’t swim fast, they don’t lie flat on the sea bed and they don’t wriggle through weeds. This is the shape of a clinging fish – the kind that hold fast to a surface and let the world wash over them.

There are a good fish that do this, but I did say that this one is from Ireland, which helps narrow it down even more – enough for Chris to identify it correctly. This is a Cornish Sucker Lepadogaster purpurea (Bonnaterre, 1788). These weird little fish are pretty awesome. They cling to rocks along the shore with a suction cup made from their fused pelvic fins and they can change colour to blend into the rocks they attach to. Partly this will be for camouflage to avoid predators, but it will also be to help them ambush the smaller fish and crustaceans that they feed on.

One small issue for me is that the name on the label for this specimen is Lepadogaster lepadogaster (Bonnaterre, 1788). The taxonomy of this genus was reassessed in 2002 and the northern population of Lepadogaster (including those from the UK and Ireland) was found to be distinct from the more southerly distributed population. So once again, I need to update a label because advances in taxonomy have messed up our 100+ year old information. That’s the trouble with science – it keeps finding out new stuff.

One thought on “Friday mystery object #359 answer

  1. thanks again paolo for another mystery adventure!

    i wandered off on the Lepadogaster trail and read up on their distinctive behavior and form. i was struck by the description of it’s shape of “triangular shaped head and a flattened body” (wiki), and thought immediately of our local example of convergent evolution, albeit a bit larger, the thornback guitarfish: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26307198

    iNaturalist is a wonder of species observed from citizen scientists worldwide… i’m always tempted to swipe a photo and quasi-post to get a suggested name of one of paolo’s puzzles… but i haven’t. (there’s even one observation that may look familiar to some: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/19769453 )

    science giveth (L. purpurea), and science taketh away (poor pluto!), always an adventure!

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